Does a blog need comments?

Blog commentsI’ve always been of the firm belief that a blog just isn’t a blog unless you’ve got comments enabled. Without comments, it’s just a website that sort of vaguely, structurally resembles a blog.

But isn’t the whole point of a blog to stimulate conversation and feedback?

But how many of us really make it a practice to comment on other people’s blogs? How many of us think about how important it might be to supporting the general ecosystem of the social web — never mind what it might do for our businesses?

Not too many of us, I am guessing.

And yet, as bloggers ourselves, we probably spend a fair bit of time fretting over how few people comment on our own blogs.

I wrote a post on the HubSpot inbound marketing blog about how to comment on other people’s blogs like you mean it. I’d love to hear what you think.

Do you comment on other people’s blogs? Do you think it’s important to the success of a blog? Do you wish more people would comment on your own blog?

Is a blog a blog, if it doesn’t have comments?

7 Thoughts.

  1. I find myself sharing posts I engage with on Twitter and Facebook more often than I comment. I’ll add tidbits and perspective along with my posting or RT and make sure to credit the author so they see any conversation my posting generates. The disadvantage to that is that it doesn’t always benefit people reading the original post down the line.

  2. I definitely appreciate comments and actively seek them out – via social media, via my email newsletter, and, if I have written a posting that I really want feedback from my peers, I will send an email out directly soliciting comments (so far I’ve only done that once, however it generated quite a few comments). I also make a point to send out an email to anyone who does post a comment – thanking them. It’s common courtesy.

    I make it a point, too, to comment regularly on others’ blogs on topics of interest to me.

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  4. I find myself sharing posts I engage with on Twitter and Facebook more often than I comment. I’ll add tidbits and perspective along with my posting or RT and make sure to credit the author so they see any conversation my posting generates. The disadvantage to that is that it doesn’t always benefit people reading the original post down the line.it is good;www.otodify.com

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  6. I personally use WordPress for my Blog along with the Disqus Plug in and get next to no spam. Askimet is also a great plugin to reduce spam. But I think comments are an important part of a blog. Even though I do see most of the conversation happening through social media, I think that a blog provides a threaded conversation that everyone can read and participate in easily.

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